This is music that stands alone on its own merits and commands attention through the sheer musicality of Pyne’s fine writing and the interpretation of the quartet as collective voice.

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Charlie Pyne (double bass & vocals); Luke Pinkstone (saxophones); Liam Dunachie (piano); Katie Patterson (drums)

This is the second album from the Charlie Pyne Quartet, and it has to be said that this is an album that is full of strong melodies and inventive playing. Pyne has written all the compositions, and this gives the music a sense of identity and continuity. One person's story if you will, told through some thoughtful lyrics and fresh writing for the quartet that is not afraid to expressive itself with some hard hitting solos.

As a bassist, Pyne has developed a sure sense of her role allowing herself to lead from her instrument with a calm assurance that steadies proceedings when required but is also able to stir things up a little. As a vocalist she has a warm and affecting voice that ensures that the listener wants to capture her warm tones and the way in which she conveys the meaning in her lyrics. She also has the knack of being able to sing without lyrics within the quartet lending an additional instrumental voice to the frontline.

From the opening bars of ‘On The Shore’ one is aware of a group sound that has been honed over time, with saxophone and voice blending sympathetically leading to Dunachie’s piano solo. ‘Am I Doing It Right’ has a light and fresh melody that has as air of familiarity about it, while ‘A Fistful of Keys’ opens with a powerful introduction from drummer Katie Patterson that kick starts this driving theme that features a stunning vocal and bass solo from Pyne.

‘K P’s Parrot’ is all about melody with some impressive interplay between Pyne’s wordless vocals and the tenor of Luke Pinkstone. The saxophonist takes his opportunities well when the opportunity to solo is presented in addition to working alongside Pyne’s vocals. ‘Gratitude’ is a delightfully unexpected way to close the album with the delicate melody simply stated by tenor saxophone and arco bass before the piano drums enter in this lovely ballad.

The concept of the album is hinged on Pyne’s feelings a woman working in a creative industry, combined with her life experiences to date, and most importantly of being a mother, as evidenced in the title track. The music and lyrics are relatable to many, but do not expect an album of over sentimentality. This is music that stands alone on its own merits and commands attention through the sheer musicality of Pyne’s fine writing and the interpretation of the quartet as collective voice.